Everyday Dictatorship

Miniatures

Episode 1 – What Is Everyday Life?

We all experience everyday life – but just what exactly is it? Dr Kate Ferris and Dr Huw Halstead discuss what it means to study ‘everyday life’ in the past and why this is such an engaging yet challenging kind of history. They are joined by special guests Prof Claire Langhamer (University of Sussex), Dr Claire Eldridge (University of Leeds), Prof John Bennet (British School at Athens/University of Sheffield), Dr Nikos Papadogiannis (Bangor University), Dr Claudio Hernández-Burgos (University of Granada), and Dr Joshua Arthurs (West Virginia University).


Episode 2 – Favourite Miniatures

What can we learn from studying small, localised, and perhaps seemingly inconsequential incidents? Dr Kate Ferris and Dr Huw Halstead unpick some compelling stories that reveal the richness and texture of everyday life history. Featuring special guests Prof Claire Langhamer (University of Sussex), Dr Claire Eldridge (University of Leeds), Prof John Bennet (British School at Athens/University of Sheffield), Dr Claudio Hernández-Burgos (University of Granada), and Dr Joshua Arthurs (West Virginia University).


Episode 3 – The Secret to Happiness: Everyday Emotions with Prof Claire Langhamer

What’s the secret to everyday happiness? Prof Claire Langhamer (University of Sussex) joins us to discuss this question as well as love, agony aunts, the concept of ‘ordinary people’, and the importance of reliable stationary.


Episode 4 – Why the Fascists Excavated Rome: Everyday Interactions with the Past with Dr Joshua Arthurs

Why did the Italian Fascists excavate Rome? Dr Joshua Arthurs (West Virginia University) talks to us about Fascist archaeology and what this can tell us about how the regime understood the past and envisaged the future, as well as introducing us to his latest research on everyday life during the 45 days in 1943 when it seemed that Fascist rule was over.


Episode 5 – Why Leisure Is Not Just Having Fun: Youth, Politics & Sexuality with Dr Nikos Papadogiannis

You’ve heard of ‘Americanisation’, but what about ‘Sovietism’? Dr Nikos Papadogiannis (Bangor University) describes youth culture, leisure, politics, and sexuality in Cold War Greece in the years after the fall of the Greek military dictatorship in 1974.


Episode 6 – Stealing 99 Bottles of Alcohol: Military Tribunals & Memory Activism with Dr Claire Eldridge

Archives may be dusty places, but as Dr Claire Eldridge (University of Leeds) shows us they are far from being dry and emotionless ones. Drawing on her research on Algerian history and French colonialism, Claire discusses first how two groups of postcolonial migrants from Algeria to France remember the colonial past, and second what we can learn about soldiers’ lives during the First World War from the records of military tribunals.

Episode 7 – When Ethnicity Is Taboo: Everyday Ethnicity in Rwanda with Dr Meghan Laws

What’s it like to live in a country dealing with the traumatic aftermath of a genocide? And in a country that also criminalises most public expressions or discussions of ethnicity? Dr Meghan Laws (St Andrews) joins us to talk about her work in Rwanda and the ‘hidden transcripts’ of ethnicity that lie beneath the surface of the official ‘ethnic amnesia’.


The music you hear at the beginning and end of
Miniatures is a Cypriot song that accompanies the traditional Sickle Dance. It was performed by the folk band Oi Palaiológoi. The violin is played by Roddy Beaton and the outi is played by David Hughes. Our thanks to the band for their permission to use the track.

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