Publications & Outreach

Our first major publication will be an edited volume of specially commissioned chapters, entitled (provisionally) Visualising War: Interplay between Battle Narratives across Antiquity. Reflecting the two main elements of our project, this volume will (a) provide critical, up-to-date discussions of key methodological issues relating to the study of narratives and narrative interplay, and (b) examine instances of narrative interaction between representations of battle in all sorts of genres and media from the 9th century BCE to the 6th century CE. Ranging across Greek, Roman, Jewish, early Christian and ancient Near Eastern material, the volume will illuminate gaps in interaction as well as connections and dialogue. Above all, it will examine the far-reaching impact of instances of interplay between battle narratives from different periods and places.

The project’s Principal Investigators are also engaged in separate research projects of their own which feed into the Visualising War research project; and the same is true of other members of the Visualising War Research Group.

Our wider aim is that the research underpinning this project will regularly lead to knowledge exchange activities and collaborations – with journalists, film makers, artists, gaming experts, politicians, military personnel, victims of conflict, and the wider community. Specifically, we are exploring the possibility of an outreach project with several war museums, and a series of radio programmes on the role which battle narratives (as cultural phenomena) have played in shaping how we record and retell history, how we visualise war in the present, and how we anticipate and prepare ourselves for future conflict.

We have been fortunate to secure funding for several research assistants to build an interactive database of hyperlinked battle narratives for our project website (coming soon), with the aim of illuminating both the extent and contours of narrative interplay across space and time. In the meantime, various members of the Visualising War Research Group are engaged in knowledge exchange and outreach activities of their own, for example: