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Letters of Andrew Lang to Sir William Craigie

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Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, April 10, [1897].  ms36880
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, April 10, [1897]. ms36880
1 Marloes Road, Kensington W. Apr.10 [1897]. Dear Craigie, Many thanks, but is the Feuds (underlined) book in the College Library, or how can a body get at it? This town is destitute of any books a reasonable man wants to read. I have found a rich vein of Highland villains in the Cumberland papers, and I make no doubt this Feuds book leads up to the affairs. I'll try the museum of course, but it is a heart breaking place. I would rather buy, borrow or steal. Yours very truly, A. Lang., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, April 10, [1897]. ms36880., 1 Marloes Road, Kensington W. Apr.10 [1897]. Dear Craigie, Many thanks, but is the Feuds (underlined) book in the College Library, or how can a body get at it? This town is destitute of any books a reasonable man wants to read. I have found a rich vein of Highland villains in the Cumberland papers, and I make no doubt this Feuds book leads up to the affairs. I'll try the museum of course, but it is a heart breaking place. I would rather buy, borrow or steal. Yours very truly, A. Lang.
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, December 30, [1900].  ms36895
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, December 30, [1900]. ms36895
Alleyne House, St Andrews, Scotland. Dec. 30 [1900]. Dear Craigie, Could you refer me to any places in sagas where a man is burned on board his ship, after his death? It seems to me familiar. Do you think Balder was an oak spirit, sacrificed to an oak, the same repeated yearly as human victims to keep oaks lively? I think Balderdash is the word for these ideas of J.G. Frazer's. Your fairies are for 1901 book. If you agree with Frazer, I shall think his theory the sounder. Yours very truly, A. Lang., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, December 30, [1900]. ms36895., Alleyne House, St Andrews, Scotland. Dec. 30 [1900]. Dear Craigie, Could you refer me to any places in sagas where a man is burned on board his ship, after his death? It seems to me familiar. Do you think Balder was an oak spirit, sacrificed to an oak, the same repeated yearly as human victims to keep oaks lively? I think Balderdash is the word for these ideas of J.G. Frazer's. Your fairies are for 1901 book. If you agree with Frazer, I shall think his theory the sounder. Yours very truly, A. Lang.
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, December 31, [1895].  ms36873/1 and 2
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, December 31, [1895]. ms36873/1 and 2
8 Gibson Place, St Andrews, Scotland. Dec. 31. [1895]. Dear Mr Craigie, The cause of the Austral spook is so apparent that I hardly think it would take people in, though I suppose it did. At Corby Castle a similar spook was instantly discovered, - a man going to the w.c.! Otherwise it would do very well. Would you like me to send it to Longman? Your brother's story is very well told. I sent it to Myers with every privacy, of course. It is interesting because it is one of three almost exactly similar, which, of course, argues the existence of that curious state of mind. Counting a similar one, in a lawyer's office, that makes four. The clerks heard the lawyer talking, but did not (underlined) hear the ghost's remarks. He is a very well known man who told me himself, but his mind was entirely occupied with the ghost's affairs. Your brother's case, preceded by a certain confusion (liver probably) answers to the famous Valogue story (1707) but in it (underlined) the ghost's owner had died at a distance, which the seer did not know. If the G. had given any information unknown to your brother before, and true, there would be more point in it. I sent Millie to Crockett. Please stick to the Table and lights. Did they send you the Bocan? You should translate your Icelandic Bocan [goblin] and Sheriff. Yours very truly, A. Lang. By the way, has your brother had any other hallucinations? I'd like him to try a glass ball which I shall send, the box contains printed directions. The more people who try it the better. It has, of course, nothing to do with ghosts (underlined), but a good deal to do with psychology, and a person who has had a spontaneous hallucination may be capable of successful experiment with the ball. Of course many people can see in it, who never had spontaneous hallucinations, and vice versa (underlined). I have had (as far as I can account for it) spontaneous hallucinations, but am no good with the ball., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, December 31, [1895]. ms36876/1 (pages 1-4) and ms36876/2 (pages 5-6)., 8 Gibson Place, St Andrews, Scotland. Dec. 31. [1895]. Dear Mr Craigie, The cause of the Austral spook is so apparent that I hardly think it would take people in, though I suppose it did. At Corby Castle a similar spook was instantly discovered, - a man going to the w.c.! Otherwise it would do very well. Would you like me to send it to Longman? Your brother's story is very well told. I sent it to Myers with every privacy, of course. It is interesting because it is one of three almost exactly similar, which, of course, argues the existence of that curious state of mind. Counting a similar one, in a lawyer's office, that makes four. The clerks heard the lawyer talking, but did not (underlined) hear the ghost's remarks. He is a very well known man who told me himself, but his mind was entirely occupied with the ghost's affairs. Your brother's case, preceded by a certain confusion (liver probably) answers to the famous Valogue story (1707) but in it (underlined) the ghost's owner had died at a distance, which the seer did not know. If the G. had given any information unknown to your brother before, and true, there would be more point in it. I sent Millie to Crockett. Please stick to the Table and lights. Did they send you the Bocan? You should translate your Icelandic Bocan [goblin] and Sheriff. Yours very truly, A. Lang. By the way, has your brother had any other hallucinations? I'd like him to try a glass ball which I shall send, the box contains printed directions. The more people who try it the better. It has, of course, nothing to do with ghosts (underlined), but a good deal to do with psychology, and a person who has had a spontaneous hallucination may be capable of successful experiment with the ball. Of course many people can see in it, who never had spontaneous hallucinations, and vice versa (underlined). I have had (as far as I can account for it) spontaneous hallucinations, but am no good with the ball.
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, February 15, [1898].  ms36883
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, February 15, [1898]. ms36883
Alleyne House, St Andrews, Scotland. Feb. 15, [1898]. Dear Craigie, Everything Scribile (underlined) is in my introduction to Badminton Golf Book. Everard has Lanthier's Jeu de Mail (underlined) (1717). The rules are wonderfully like those of Golf, but the Club is hammershaped (sic). (Drawing of hammer-shaped club and ball). I. Cunningham has an article (not yet published) in which he makes out a very good case for Holland as the cradle of Golf. You might write to him. Yours, A. Lang., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, February 15, [1898]. ms36883., Alleyne House, St Andrews, Scotland. Feb. 15, [1898]. Dear Craigie, Everything Scribile (underlined) is in my introduction to Badminton Golf Book. Everard has Lanthier's Jeu de Mail (underlined) (1717). The rules are wonderfully like those of Golf, but the Club is hammershaped (sic). (Drawing of hammer-shaped club and ball). I. Cunningham has an article (not yet published) in which he makes out a very good case for Holland as the cradle of Golf. You might write to him. Yours, A. Lang.
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, February 21, [year unknown].  ms36909
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, February 21, [year unknown]. ms36909
8 Atholl Crescent, Edinburgh. Feb 21 [year unknown]. Dear Craigie, Many thanks. You see the hole (underlined) survived till about 1750 or so, in English cricket, a man was run out when the ball was put into the hole. The wicket (drawing of wicket) was a late addition. In Scotland, two holes, in double wicket, were bowled at, with no wicket, no stumps. The Yellow and Dun Cow books I look on in the same way as you do, but what I wonder is, was there an older poem, in verse, behind them? Gowrie should be interesting. Do you know my publication of George Sprot's Confessions, for the Roxburghe Club? Yours very truly, A. Lang., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, February 21, [year unknown]. ms36909., 8 Atholl Crescent, Edinburgh. Feb 21 [year unknown]. Dear Craigie, Many thanks. You see the hole (underlined) survived till about 1750 or so, in English cricket, a man was run out when the ball was put into the hole. The wicket (drawing of wicket) was a late addition. In Scotland, two holes, in double wicket, were bowled at, with no wicket, no stumps. The Yellow and Dun Cow books I look on in the same way as you do, but what I wonder is, was there an older poem, in verse, behind them? Gowrie should be interesting. Do you know my publication of George Sprot's Confessions, for the Roxburghe Club? Yours very truly, A. Lang.
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, February 29, [1912].  ms36911
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, February 29, [1912]. ms36911
Letter by Andrew Lang to William A Craigie 8 Gibson Place, St Andrews, Feb 29 [1912] Dear Craigie, Very nice Viardogr, but they are as common here as in Norway. The psychs call them "arrival cases". Kirk (1693) called the V, the Co-walkers. As I read your paper lots of parallels, privately known to me, came into my mind. I remembered that my father had a V. which I never knew till one of my brothers told me what he heard. At that time I had no knowledge at all of these things. A case so chronic as your cobbler's I have not met, I admit. Mrs Purdie once saw a V. It is odd indeed that you have not heard of plenty in this country. Yours very truly A Lang, Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, February 29, [1912]. ms36911., 8 Gibson Place, St Andrews, Feb 29 [1912] Dear Craigie, Very nice Viardogr, but they are as common here as in Norway. The psychs call them "arrival cases". Kirk (1693) called the V, the Co-walkers. As I read your paper lots of parallels, privately known to me, came into my mind. I remembered that my father had a V. which I never knew till one of my brothers told me what he heard. At that time I had no knowledge at all of these things. A case so chronic as your cobbler's I have not met, I admit. Mrs Purdie once saw a V. It is odd indeed that you have not heard of plenty in this country. Yours very truly A Lang
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 13, [1905?].  ms36899
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 13, [1905?]. ms36899
Alleyne House, St Andrews, Scotland. Jan. 13 [1905?] Dear Craigie, I read in an ungrammatic corner of an evening paper that an essay had been read, I think to the Viking Society, about the burial of St Magnus. The interest, for my purpose, was that the people of various villages joined the procession, that they were nicknamed "Eaters of" - this or that, and that the nicknames still survive (phrase underlined). This is the case in Devon and Somerset, in the Sioux tribes etc. Now do you know the sagas, pretty late I think, of the burial? If you do, and could give me the nicknames, or even if I could get a printed copy of the essay, it fits into my book about totems etc., which has reached that point in proof sheets. Of course I don't mean that there were any totems there in St Magnus's time: I only want nicknames derived from eating this or that. Of course if they have survived to this day, tant mieux (underlined). Hard frost here, but the skating is squalid. Yours very truly, A. Lang., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 13, [1905?]. ms36899., Alleyne House, St Andrews, Scotland. Jan. 13 [1905?] Dear Craigie, I read in an ungrammatic corner of an evening paper that an essay had been read, I think to the Viking Society, about the burial of St Magnus. The interest, for my purpose, was that the people of various villages joined the procession, that they were nicknamed "Eaters of" - this or that, and that the nicknames still survive (phrase underlined). This is the case in Devon and Somerset, in the Sioux tribes etc. Now do you know the sagas, pretty late I think, of the burial? If you do, and could give me the nicknames, or even if I could get a printed copy of the essay, it fits into my book about totems etc., which has reached that point in proof sheets. Of course I don't mean that there were any totems there in St Magnus's time: I only want nicknames derived from eating this or that. Of course if they have survived to this day, tant mieux (underlined). Hard frost here, but the skating is squalid. Yours very truly, A. Lang.
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 2, [1901].  ms36896
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 2, [1901]. ms36896
Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 2, [1901]. ms36896., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 2, [1901]. ms36896.
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 21, [1901].  ms36898
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 21, [1901]. ms36898
Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 21, [1901]. ms36898., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 21, [1901]. ms36898.
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 25, [1900].  ms36889
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 25, [1900]. ms36889
Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 25, [1900]. ms36889., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, January 25, [1900]. ms36889.
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, March 4, [1912].  ms36912
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, March 4, [1912]. ms36912
8 Gibson Place, St Andrews, March 4 [1912] Dear Craigie, I grant that the V. seems either much more common in Norway, or there it attracts more attention. That is proved by its possessing a name in ordinary talk, whereas Myers for the same thing here had to invent a term. Yet for Mr Kirk, in his Secret Commonwealth (about 1690,) the thing had a name, the Co-walker. Whether this co-walker is from the Gaelic or not, I don't know. But I get firsthand cases of the V. from Rev Mr MacInnes, Glencoe. My brother John writes today that he remembers my father's V. very well. "The step on the gravel and up the stone stairs to the front door, and then the latch key. It was not I alone who heard it, many did so." His recollection is that he "went out more than once to look". I have any number of cases in my memory; but I don't mean that the V. is as common in practice as in Norway; and here people who come across it think but little of it. But in Glencoe it is quite recognised, whether it has a Gaelic name or not. It is amazing that Highland collectors do not know the thing. As soon as I read your article I asked Shewan (the Homeric) if he had ever heard of the V. but said that he had heard it, but had not thought about it, nor heard of it previously. Myers invented an explanation of the V; not North but general. Yours very truly A Lang One of your informants talks of the "fore-walker". Much like Kirk's "Co-walker" who "goes to his own herd" when his owner dies. Are there no "fetchers" in the sagas? Mr MacInnes told me that his brother and another lad were expected in the glen, to which they were walking. There was heavy snow and they were late but their V's knocked at the door, breakfast was made ready, and the owners of the V's, when they came, were glad to get it., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, March 4, [1912]. ms36912., 8 Gibson Place, St Andrews, March 4 [1912] Dear Craigie, I grant that the V. seems either much more common in Norway, or there it attracts more attention. That is proved by its possessing a name in ordinary talk, whereas Myers for the same thing here had to invent a term. Yet for Mr Kirk, in his Secret Commonwealth (about 1690,) the thing had a name, the Co-walker. Whether this co-walker is from the Gaelic or not, I don't know. But I get firsthand cases of the V. from Rev Mr MacInnes, Glencoe. My brother John writes today that he remembers my father's V. very well. "The step on the gravel and up the stone stairs to the front door, and then the latch key. It was not I alone who heard it, many did so." His recollection is that he "went out more than once to look". I have any number of cases in my memory; but I don't mean that the V. is as common in practice as in Norway; and here people who come across it think but little of it. But in Glencoe it is quite recognised, whether it has a Gaelic name or not. It is amazing that Highland collectors do not know the thing. As soon as I read your article I asked Shewan (the Homeric) if he had ever heard of the V. but said that he had heard it, but had not thought about it, nor heard of it previously. Myers invented an explanation of the V; not North but general. Yours very truly A Lang One of your informants talks of the "fore-walker". Much like Kirk's "Co-walker" who "goes to his own herd" when his owner dies. Are there no "fetchers" in the sagas? Mr MacInnes told me that his brother and another lad were expected in the glen, to which they were walking. There was heavy snow and they were late but their V's knocked at the door, breakfast was made ready, and the owners of the V's, when they came, were glad to get it.
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, March 6, [1912].  ms36913/1 and 2
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, March 6, [1912]. ms36913/1 and 2
Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, March 6, [1912]. ms31913/1 (pages 1-4)and ms31913/2 (pages 5-7)., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, March 6, [1912]. ms31913/1 (pages 1-4)and ms31913/2 (pages 5-7).
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, March 8, [1912].  ms36914
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, March 8, [1912]. ms36914
St Andrews, March 8 Dear Craigie, The geography includes Siberia and North American Indian tribes. You will find a few cases in my Making of Religion. But it is the professed second-sighted man who sees them. In W.R. Scott's memoirs, (I forget the exact name) D.G. Rossetti left his Vardoge behind him, at Miss Boyd's house, Penkil or some such name. It stamped about his room, reciting poetry. This is in the fylgja line of business. I have any number of modern cases, many from my own friends, others in S.P.R. [Society for Psychical Research] proceedings. But to that Society all is familiar already. There is a Maori case, the phantasm was accepted as a death wraith, and the wife married again. It was only a Vardogr, but it's owner admitted that he had no ground of a suit against his wife, as a wraith always implied the death of it's owner - which shows no knowledge of the common Vardoge, and not more of wraiths. Rather oddly, my aunt (in law) Mrs Craig Sellar and my sister in law, Mrs Grieve, both saw their husbands come into their rooms, while there were really in their smoking roons. My own experiences, four or five (well, say three,) were only phantasms of the living, one was dying, to be sure, but he was not dead. When I said "four or five", I was thinking of other hallucinations, one of a lady, one of a strange building, both of which I thought actual objective affairs. Both were in broad daylight. Now I can't visualise a face or a place. I would astonish you if I named the lady in Oxford, who habitually sees a dead lady going about the streets. She is not interested in the subject, and does not bother herself about it. Some of the young women of the Argyll family see so many of those queer things that they regard them rather as pleasant ordinary affairs than otherwise. For example, at luncheon one day Lady Elizabeth said to Niall and Lady George, in my presence, "I saw you and Sybil drive past my window in the dogcart with the grey ponies", and Niall said "We meant to go, but we didn't", and nobody took any notice, it was so usual. You also have a Vardogr in a hurry, who came into a house which a lady meant to enter but changed her mind and went to a matinee. About my best Vardogr, at first hand, was in 75 Great King Street, Edinburgh, but it is rather a long yarn. The percipient not only saw it, (she had never seen its owner but did later) but courteously bowed to it. A day or two later she saw its owner, who was to have come to her house, but went to another opposite through a change of plans. I think telepathy covers the whole field. You remember, in Acts, when Rhoda took St Peter for his Vardogr, and shut the door on him? "I thought it had been his messenger". Yours very truly A Lang, Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, March 8, [1912]. ms36914., St Andrews, March 8 Dear Craigie, The geography includes Siberia and North American Indian tribes. You will find a few cases in my Making of Religion. But it is the professed second-sighted man who sees them. In W.R. Scott's memoirs, (I forget the exact name) D.G. Rossetti left his Vardoge behind him, at Miss Boyd's house, Penkil or some such name. It stamped about his room, reciting poetry. This is in the fylgja line of business. I have any number of modern cases, many from my own friends, others in S.P.R. [Society for Psychical Research] proceedings. But to that Society all is familiar already. There is a Maori case, the phantasm was accepted as a death wraith, and the wife married again. It was only a Vardogr, but it's owner admitted that he had no ground of a suit against his wife, as a wraith always implied the death of it's owner - which shows no knowledge of the common Vardoge, and not more of wraiths. Rather oddly, my aunt (in law) Mrs Craig Sellar and my sister in law, Mrs Grieve, both saw their husbands come into their rooms, while there were really in their smoking roons. My own experiences, four or five (well, say three,) were only phantasms of the living, one was dying, to be sure, but he was not dead. When I said "four or five", I was thinking of other hallucinations, one of a lady, one of a strange building, both of which I thought actual objective affairs. Both were in broad daylight. Now I can't visualise a face or a place. I would astonish you if I named the lady in Oxford, who habitually sees a dead lady going about the streets. She is not interested in the subject, and does not bother herself about it. Some of the young women of the Argyll family see so many of those queer things that they regard them rather as pleasant ordinary affairs than otherwise. For example, at luncheon one day Lady Elizabeth said to Niall and Lady George, in my presence, "I saw you and Sybil drive past my window in the dogcart with the grey ponies", and Niall said "We meant to go, but we didn't", and nobody took any notice, it was so usual. You also have a Vardogr in a hurry, who came into a house which a lady meant to enter but changed her mind and went to a matinee. About my best Vardogr, at first hand, was in 75 Great King Street, Edinburgh, but it is rather a long yarn. The percipient not only saw it, (she had never seen its owner but did later) but courteously bowed to it. A day or two later she saw its owner, who was to have come to her house, but went to another opposite through a change of plans. I think telepathy covers the whole field. You remember, in Acts, when Rhoda took St Peter for his Vardogr, and shut the door on him? "I thought it had been his messenger". Yours very truly A Lang
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, October 16 [1895].  ms36871
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, October 16 [1895]. ms36871
Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, October 16, [1895]. ms 36871., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, October 16, [1895]. ms 36871., Refers to "The poems and songs of Robert Burns" edited with introduction, notes and glossary by Andrew Lang, assisted by W.A. Craigie (1896) PR4300.E96L2 and Lan PR4300.E96L2.
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, October 18, [1895].  ms36872
Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, October 18, [1895]. ms36872
Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, Oct 18, [1895]. ms36872., Letter from Andrew Lang to William Alexander Craigie, Oct 18, [1895]. ms36872.

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