Publications

The main output of the project will be a pair of peer-reviewed edited volumes, each containing a balanced and interlocking set of articles by invited contributors.

The first of these, to be entitled (provisionally) Literary Interactions under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: vol. 1 (edd. A. König & C. Whitton), is in production and due to be published in 2016. It aims to build on the work of the project’s first two conferences, held in St Andrews in June 2013 and in Rostock in June 2014, and will have a primarily Latin focus. More details are available here.

The second edited volume will follow the project’s Boston conference (to be held in summer 2015),  and will focus particularly on the challenges of reading across Greek and Roman authors (and cultures), with some emphasis also on interactions between Greco-Roman, Jewish and Christian writing and reading practices. It will thus expand the focus of volume 1 by branching out to consider a wider spread of texts and questions.

In addition to the edited volumes, a series of Working Papers is being added to monthly on this website. Workshop and conference proceedings, conference-paper synopses and chapter abstracts are also being published here. Participants are also collaborating to produce an archive of modern scholarship and ancient references, which will support research during the course of the project and be of use to others beyond it.

A wider-ranging research project is planned on interactions between literary and less-literary/non-literary spheres of activity (military, administrative, technical, legal, political, economic, religious, and artistic) under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian. This project, based at the University of St Andrews and directed by Alice König, will not only explore the interface between literature and society across the empire in that period, from a range of angles; it aims also to interrogate some of the methodologies that underpin such a study, and to produce (among other things) a new cultural history of Nervan, Trajanic and Hadrianic times.